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Antonio Brown Quit On The Steelers — He Can Get Lost

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Antonio Brown Quit On The Steelers — He Can Get Lost

The Pittsburgh Steelers would be best served to just forget Antonio Brown was ever a Steeler. 

This week, Brown said via Twitter that he wished to retire as Steeler. 

This coming after he burned every bridge on his way out of Pittsburgh just a few short years ago. 

Antonio Brown was last seen taking off his jersey and quitting on his most recent team at MetLife Stadium in early January in a game between the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and New York Jets. And that is a fitting end to the career of the 33 year old receiver.

There is no set of circumstances for Brown to meet that should convince team owner Art Rooney II to entertain this idea put forth in a 5 word tweet. And for the record, Antonio Brown is talking about signing a non-playing contract which would only allow him to retire as a member of the organization. Regardless, Mr. Rooney should not take a meeting with the disgraced former wide out. He should just ignore it.

Steelers Antonio Brown

ATLANTA, GA – DECEMBER 14: Antonio Brown #84 of the Pittsburgh Steelers runs after a catch in the second half against the Atlanta Falcons at the Georgia Dome on December 14, 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

More Harm Than Good

What would Antonio Brown retiring a Steeler even accomplish from a team perspective? Would his particular brand of lunacy work as an ambassador to the Steelers brand? Are they going to have a “Killer B’s Day” some Sunday at halftime where we celebrate all of that era’s accomplishments? All the missed opportunities, and hey, they could maybe play one of Le’Veon Bell‘s rap songs over the PA as they show highlights of the Steelers overlooking and then losing to Blake Bortles and the Jacksonville Jaguars in the playoffs. Or maybe Browns’ last game as a Steeler in 2018, where he was standing on the sideline in a fur coat after quitting on the team and getting benched by head coach, Mike Tomlin. A “Killer B’s Day” at Heinz Field, boy wouldn’t that be depressing?

Should the Steelers allow Antonio Brown to retire as a member of the Black and Gold?

For my money, No! The Steelers don’t need to rehash what was one of the most tumultuous times in franchise history. They have moved on, and thank God for that! What’s more, Brown doesn’t deserve it. If a player no longer wishes to play for a team or to test the market in free agency in lieu of a big payday, that’s all well and good. That’s the business side of football. Le’Veon Bell did just that, he bet on himself. It didn’t pay off, and his career probably would have thrived if he had allowed the Steelers to make him the highest paid running back in league history. But it was a business decision. Whining and complaining about the team, quarreling with your quarterback and walking out of practice, and chastising your coach for benching you after you refused to practice does not earn you any special privilege. Not to mention all his antics after he forced his way out of Pittsburgh.

Perhaps Brown and Ben Roethlisberger have buried the hatchet. The former did congratulate that later on his retirement last season. And if Brown wants to bury the hatchet with Tomlin, Mr. Rooney and the organization, then that should be encouraged. But that is where it ends. Antonio Brown should not be granted a chance to retire a Steeler. That ship sailed long ago.

 

That’s my take on it. But what do yinz think? Should Brown retire a Steeler? Click to comment below!

#SteelerNation

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Angie

    May 19, 2022 at 9:15 am

    Absolutely not!!!! He’s just trying to boost his horrid rap performances. Dude is a head case, thanks in huge part to that Burficts hit. I can’t lie, I do feel bad for Bell, he could’ve had it all, and he blew it, and he KNOWS it!!! Brown never sees anything wrong with his actions,
    Brown lost his elite status when he quit on the best team in the NFL.

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